The one things everyone’s mind at the moment in UK and around the world is what has become known as Brexit, the UK’s exit from the European Union. Every channel you turn to you can hear how Government has turned on themselves with ministers resigning left, right and centre. But what does this mean for our industry, what does it all mean for the arts?

It is known that the arts industry is one the largest proportions of stay voters through the campaign. For the industry to survive it needs policies like freedom of movement for people and equipment, the current set up also allows access to further funding that would not necessarily be otherwise available.

So what happens when Brexit deal is reached and article 50 is triggered, what will this mean for our industry?

  • Well the price of tickets will go up or the number of production will go down
  • Restriction on funding
  • Delays to projects where equipment is shared cross boarder
  • Worker rights may be affected cross boarder

So what are industry representatives and unions negotiating to be part of the deal? Well it looks something like this:

  • The continuation of free movement
  • An immigration system that works for both members and their families
  • Tariff free movement of equipment
  • Democratic oversight of negotiations
  • A voice in any negotiations regarding tax and state aid rules
  • Continued membership of Creative Europe
  • EU regulation on copyright to be brought into UK law
  • A continuation of European Employee protection in UK law

The organisations are working hard, there is no better time to join a union in the creative sector as now, the more people they have to back this, the better the outcome.

Remember, the UK was Hollywood’s choice of location to film blockbusters like Solo: A Star Wars Story, Mission: Impossible – Fallout and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. All of which contributed £1.7bn to the UK’s economy. But film makers are worried that recruitment of industry specialists will become harder if the deal on Brexit is not right.

Lord Puttnam, who produced Chariots of Fire and is president of the Film Distributors’ Association, has said more investment in home-grown films “with a distinctive British voice could help to deliver a form of national re-branding”.